Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?

By W. Durant C. | Go to book overview

NO CHEESE-PARING ECONOMY

Frank Lee United States Attorney, Muskogee, Oklahoma

NO law can be effective if not enforced. This plan, therefore, contemplates such firm and rigorous enforcement as to secure not only respect but absolute obedience without radical change in our judicial system.

It also contemplates no discrepancy as to punishment because of wealth, poverty, station or influence. Rich violators and poor violators to receive the same treatment whether in fines, behind the bars or on the same rock pile.

The three co-ordinate branches of government--legislative, executive and judicial--must be employed in the plan here submitted.


10 Changes in Law Proposed

Our National Prohibition Act as it stands is the first gesture of Congress in giving effect to the Amendment. It has accomplished much good. In some respects it is inadequate to meet emergencies or to dispense impartial justice. A fine only is imposed for possession of intoxicants whether the quantity be a half-pint or a car load. The rich pay, the poor go to jail. Such discrepancy in punishment has created wide-spread criticism.

That penalties may be apportioned with exact justice and the Act strengthened it should be modified and amended to effect the following results:

Warrants to be allowed and authorized for the purpose of searching all buildings in which the law is being violated.

Punishment for violating any provision of the Act should be by fine or by imprisonment for not less than 60 days nor more than one year, or by both such fine and imprison-

-327-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 578

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.