Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?

By W. Durant C. | Go to book overview

BACK COMPETENT AGENTS

A. W. McDaniel, Prohibition Agent Laurel, Mississippi

PRIOR to the addition of the 18th Amendment we had to deal with illicit distilling, transporting, selling and failing to pay government taxes as required.

To take care of this situation the internal revenue statutes were made the law and practically all violations of these were made a felony.

Under these it was a felony to manufacture illicit liquor, to transport liquor on which taxes had not been paid, to possess liquor on which taxes had not been paid and to sell liquor on which taxes had not been paid. On appeal cases since the passage of the 18th Amendment the Supreme Court has held the internal revenue statutes are still in force.

When the Constitution of the United States, the highest and supreme law of the land, was amended to prohibit liquor, and the law must needs be strengthened rather than weakened, what happened?


Volstead Act Helps Bootleggers

The Volstead Act was passed, undoubtedly an act fostered by the wets to protect the moonshiner, rum-runner and bootlegger. Laws already needing to be strengthened were weakened. Felonies were made misdemeanors.

Under this Acta moonshiner can make one quart or 1000 gallons of liquor and receive only a fine and jail sentence. He can transport any quantity of liquor without affecting the penalty. He can sell in any quantity without affecting the penalty.

Under the internal revenue statutes all vehicles used in the transportation of liquor were to be confiscated. The Volstead Act fixed it so that they could be released. This was done apparently to protect the innocent lien holder, but

-345-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 578

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.