Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?

By W. Durant C. | Go to book overview

ROAD AND WORKHOUSE SENTENCES

C. G. Saunders, Assistant Superintendent, Bureau of Identification, Police Department, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

PROHIBITION is just like all other crimes inasmuch as there will be people who will commit it even though the penalty be death. We have had crime since the world began and will continue to have it till the end. But that is no reason that we should get discouraged and let up or quit.

With the trend of affairs as they now are it would be fatal to even let up just a little bit. So we will have to take into consideration the following facts to make enforcement more effective.

The one thing of greatest importance in combating this crime is public sentiment. Mobilizing this will do more towards curbing the liquor evil than all else. Using first the churches, then the schools as a base to operate from, public spirited citizens can and will broadcast enough propaganda to enlighten the public and make them see where they are and just why it is so important that we have prohibition.

We have much right to praise those pioneers who fought and struggled long years ago to have the 18th Amendment and the Volstead Act passed and made into the laws of our country. They foresaw the utter impossibility of liquor plus the great motorized age of today. They were broad- minded enough to see that liquor and gasoline would not mix. And they will not.

Alcohol numbs the mind. Therefore it has no place in this great age of unrestfulness, adventure and progress.

The world at large is too busy to have liquor impede its progress.

There are only a few who insist that we should have

-423-

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