Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?

By W. Durant C. | Go to book overview

PLEDGE ALL EXECUTIVES

City Manager C. O. Sherrill Cincinnati, Ohio

THE National Prohibition Act (The Volstead Act) passed October 28th, 1919, became effective on January 16th, 1920.

Since that act was passed all the states, except five-- New York, Maryland, New Mexico, Nevada and Montana --have passed enforcement acts under the concurrent authority of the 18th Amendment.

The Amendment has been operative for almost nine years and notwithstanding the open or veiled opposition to prohibition by a large part of the press and many leaders of public thought, there has been a considerable measure of success in decreasing the drinking of liquors, as indicated by the almost total absence of drunken persons on the streets of our cities, and by the tremendous decrease in withdrawals of liquor from bond since the Amendment went into effect. While there is a great deal of surreptitious drinking, particularly by the young of the wealthier classes, it must be conceded even by the enemies of prohibition that, on the whole, the drinking habit has been greatly reduced, with a resultant raising of the standard of living of the American laboring classes.

The evil resulting from inefficient enforcement is not so much the amount of drinking being done (except in several large cities where local authorities make no effort to enforce the law) as in the contempt for all the laws of the land by part of the press, by a small percentage of the public, particularly the young of the well-to-do classes and by bootleggers. It is this contempt of law that must be replaced by enforcement and observance of the prohibition laws and the 18th Amendment.

-435-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 578

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.