Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?

By W. Durant C. | Go to book overview

CONVERT THE COLLEGES

Lofton S. Wesley Executive Secretary, Intercollegiate Prohibition Association

THE aim of government is liberty through law. The prohibition law is one of the ways in which our government is seeking liberty for its citizens. In order that this aim may be accomplished, two things are necessary: the law must be right, and it must be supported in a positive way by a large majority of the citizens. I shall assume that the prohibition law is right. But there is a considerable group who are law-abiding citizens in most respects, but are law-breakers with reference to the 18th Amendment. In order to make the Amendment permanently effective, the attitude of these violators must be changed, and each future generation must know and appreciate the implications of the problem.

Taking up first the change of attitude, any method resulting in observance of the Amendment must include: first, actual governmental opposition to the liquor traffic until it is destroyed; second, an appeal to the citizens' highest sense of national loyalty and community responsibility; and third, the dissemination of facts concerning the relation of the problems of alcoholism to the individual and to society.

First, the organized liquor traffic must be crushed. Alcohol is a habit-forming drug, and its helpless victims must be protected. Social pressure, deliberately created by this commercialized band of liquor vendors, is the direct cause of much of our law-breaking. Crippled as the traffic is by being outlawed, it still maintains a clever system of insidious advertising. If the traffic itself is not dealt a death blow, progress in other directions is rendered more diffi-

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