Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?

By W. Durant C. | Go to book overview

"IF I WERE EMPOWERED"

Dr. Clarence True Wilson General Secretary, Board of Temperance, Prohibition and Public Morals, Methodist Episcopal Church Washington, D. C.

1. If I were President I would see that the Constitution of the United States did not become a joke during my administration. The White House would not serve intoxicating liquors or patronize bootleggers or set an example of drinking in homes while the government was committed to the opposite policy.

My Cabinet would not contain men who openly flouted the federal constitutional provisions or the federal government.

Judges of my appointment would not brazenly, from the bench, denounce the laws of the land which they had taken an oath to enforce without accounting to me and to the government in the impeachment proceedings provided for by law or through a peremptory demand for their resignation.

I would appoint as the chief enforcement officers men of executive ability, standing for character and achievement, and who, in addition, believed in this law that they were expected to spend a lifetime in enforcing, so that in all their work they would be able to work with their conscience and not be asked to work against their own conscience. Other things being equal, men will do better by the task in which they believe; therefore, no wets need apply.

My message to Congress would hold up the high ideals of citizenship and loyalty and not let down to popular lawlessness in an experimental stage of our "greatest moral experiment" through "that salutary law."

As the leader of my party as well as the executive of my

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