Sociological Aspects of Homosexuality: A Comparative Study of Three Types of Homosexuals

By Michael Schofield | Go to book overview

4 HP GROUP (HOMOSEXUALS/PATIENTS)

DESCRIPTION OF THE GROUP

The members of this group were the patients of 12 psychiatrists working in or near London. Twenty-two were in-patients of mental hospitals and 28 were out-patients under psychiatric treatment. A full description of the way this group was obtained is given in Section B of the Appendix.

It would be surprising to find any group of psychiatric patients which has many homogeneous features; but there is a particular dichotomy in this group which may have some effect upon the results. Four of the in-patients and 20 of the out-patients had consulted a psychiatrist specifically about their homosexual problems. But 18 in-patients and eight out-patients had sought psychiatric aid for other reasons, and the extent to which their homosexual condition had been the forerunner of these problems is speculative.

On the other hand the validity of the response is judged to be very high. All of them were accustomed to discussing intimate details of their lives with a psychiatrist and nine of them had been taking part in group therapy. All were volunteers and even if they did not always understand the purpose of the research, they were ready to discuss in detail their own problems; it was a peculiarity of the two patient groups that the personal questions were always answered with good elaboration, but they found the attitude and projective questions less interesting.

This group and the NP group were the youngest groups. A man is more likely to seek psychiatric aid for homosexual difficulties when he is in his twenties. By the age of thirty many homosexuals have come to terms with their disability and made some kind of adjustment; consequently they are more reluctant to undergo a change. In the HP group 26 men were under thirty and 41 men were under forty.

The two groups of patients contained more of the better educated men than the two groups interviewed in prison, but they were less well educated than the HO and NO groups. Five had received fulltime education beyond the age of eighteen, 24 more had received some education after the age of fifteen, and 21 left school at the statutory minimum age. This group also did well in the verbal reasoning test. In the six groups 84 men (making an average of 14 per group) came in the top three classes, and 18 of these were HP men.

-68-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sociological Aspects of Homosexuality: A Comparative Study of Three Types of Homosexuals
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Also by Michael Schofield The Sexual Behaviour of Young People ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Author's Note ix
  • Part 1 - Results of the Research 1
  • 1: Introduction 3
  • 2 - HC Group (Homosexuals/Convicted) 7
  • 4 - HP Group (Homosexuals/Patients) 68
  • 5 - NP Group (Non-Homosexual/Patients) 85
  • 6 - HO Group (Homosexuals/Others) 101
  • 7 - NO Group (Non-Homosexuals/Others) 129
  • Part II - Discussion of the Results 145
  • 8 - Homosexuals in Trouble 147
  • 9 - The Other Homosexuals 173
  • 10 - Sociological Aspects 185
  • II - Law Reform 193
  • 12 - Towards a Theory of Homosexuality 203
  • Appendix: Research Plan 214
  • Subject Index 241
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.