Sociological Aspects of Homosexuality: A Comparative Study of Three Types of Homosexuals

By Michael Schofield | Go to book overview

7 NO GROUP (NON-HOMOSEXUALS/OTHERS)

A. DESCRIPTION OF THE GROUP

After all the men in the HO group had been interviewed, an agency was employed to find 50 non-homosexuals of the same age and level of education. In fact it was necessary to approach 140 men in order to obtain 51 interviews. One of the men turned out to be a selfconfessed homosexual and so was excluded from this group. As will be noted later in this chapter, others in this group had homosexual experience, but in no case was it extensive and, unlike the HO men, none of these men regarded themselves as homosexual in any degree.

The many difficulties encountered during the formation of this group are examined in detail in Section B of the Appendix. But it would be a mistake to make too much of these difficulties. This NO group is not intended to be a representative sample of the nonhomosexual population; nor, for that matter, is the HO group necessarily typical of the homosexual population. The NO group is merely an assemblage of non-homosexuals who match the HO group for age and education. In Section B of the Appendix the two tables comparing age and education show that the match is almost exact. A third table which compares the area of residence in the NO group with the HO group shows that the distribution is similar in each group although the two groups were not matched for this factor.

This similarity does not extend to the place where they were born, as shown in Tables 7.1 and 7.2. Most of the NO men who live in London were also born there, but only a minority of the HO men who now live in London were born there. The tendency to migrate towards London from other parts of Great Britain is reflected in Table 7.1, but Table 7.2 makes it clear that this tendency is much stronger among homosexuals than among others (p = .001).

Despite matching for education the NO group did not do so well in the verbal reasoning test. Eight NO men were in the lowest three grades compared with three HO men; 13 NO men were in the top three grades compared with 27 HO men. These differences are statistically significant at the p = .02 level. (On the other hand Mendelsohn and Ross ( 1959) found that the academic performance of male undergraduate homosexuals was very similar to that of their non-homosexual peers.)

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Sociological Aspects of Homosexuality: A Comparative Study of Three Types of Homosexuals
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Also by Michael Schofield The Sexual Behaviour of Young People ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Author's Note ix
  • Part 1 - Results of the Research 1
  • 1: Introduction 3
  • 2 - HC Group (Homosexuals/Convicted) 7
  • 4 - HP Group (Homosexuals/Patients) 68
  • 5 - NP Group (Non-Homosexual/Patients) 85
  • 6 - HO Group (Homosexuals/Others) 101
  • 7 - NO Group (Non-Homosexuals/Others) 129
  • Part II - Discussion of the Results 145
  • 8 - Homosexuals in Trouble 147
  • 9 - The Other Homosexuals 173
  • 10 - Sociological Aspects 185
  • II - Law Reform 193
  • 12 - Towards a Theory of Homosexuality 203
  • Appendix: Research Plan 214
  • Subject Index 241
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