The American Whigs: An Anthology

By Daniel Walker Howe | Go to book overview

5
THE HIGHER LAW

William H. Seward


FREEDOM IN THE NEW TERRITORIES

William H. Seward ( 1801- 1872), a central figure in Whig history, came from western New York. He joined the Whigs from the Antimasonic party, a populistic movement that swept his region in the late 1820s and early 1830s. Together with Thurlow Weed and Horace Greeley he built a strong Whig organization. Seward compiled a progressive record as governor of New York from 1839 to 1843, promoting prison reform and state-financed intenal improvements. Unlike many leaders of his party, Seward enjoyed good relations with the Roman Catholic hierarchy and supported (vainly) state aid for parochial schools. He did not succeed, however, in breaking the Democratic hold on Catholic immigrant voters.

The following was Seward's maiden speech on the floor of the United States Senate. It was delivered against the proposed Compromise of 1850, opening the territory acquired from Mexico to slavery. Webster and Clay were backing the Compromise, but Seward, in company with most northern Whigs, had become unalterably opposed to any further extension of slavery. The Compromise passed, revealing a severe split between the Conscience Whigs like Seward and the temporizing, harmonizing "Cotton" Whigs who composed most of the party leadership. In 1854 and 1855, realizing that the division could not be healed, Seward led his antislavery Whigs into the new Republican party.

It is insisted that the admission of California shall be attended by a COMPROMISE of questions which have arisen out of SLAVERY!

I AM OPPOSED TO ANY SUCH COMPROMISE, IN ANY AND ALL THE FORMS IN WHICH IT HAS BEEN PROPOSED; because, while admitting the purity and the patriotism of all from whom it is my misfortune to differ, I think all legislative compromises, which are not absolutely

____________________

SOURCE. William Henry Seward, "Freedom in the New Territories. A Speech in the Senate of the United States. March 11, 1850." Works, ed. George E. Baker ( New York, 1853), I, 60-93.

-226-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Whigs: An Anthology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.