The Failure of the Criminal Procedure Revolution

By Craig M. Bradley | Go to book overview

Appendix A
Excerpts from the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 [as amended] (Great Britain)*

CHAPTER 60
PART I POWERS TO STOP AND SEARCH
1. Power of constable to stop, search persons, vehicles etc.180
2. Provisions relating to search under s.1 and other powers.181
3. Duty to make records concerning searches.182
4. Road checks.183
5. Reports of recorded searches and of road checks.
6. Statutory undertakers etc.
7. Part I -- supplementary.

PART II POWERS OF ENTRY, SEARCH AND SEIZURE
Search warrants
8. Power of the justice of the peace to authorise entry and search
of premises.
185
9. Special provisions as to access.186
10. Meaning of "items subject to legal privilege."186
11. Meaning of "excluded material."187
12. Meaning of "personal records."187
13. Meaning of "journalstic material."
14. Meaning of "specific procedure material."
15. Search warrants -- safeguards.187
16. Execution of warrants.188
Entry and search without search warrant
17. Entry for purpose of arrest etc.189
18. Entry and search after arrest.190
____________________
*
Reprinted under license from Her Majesty's Stationer's Office. Citations and some technical sections (identified in the Contents lst by a †) are not reprinted; they may be found in the appendix to Michael Zander, The Police and Crminial Evidence Act, 1984. As noted in Chapter 5, I consider PACE and the accompanying Codes of Practice prolix and complex. They are reproduced here not as models for an American statutory scheme but as a starting point for those who draft such statutes.

-177-

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