The Novel as Performance: The Fiction of Ronald Sukenick and Raymond Federman

By Jerzy Kutnik | Go to book overview

Foreword

Larry McCaffery

There is a telling but predictable irony that the first. book-length study of the fiction of Ronald Sukenick and Raymond Federman to be published in the United States -- Jerzy Kutnik fine analysis, The Novel as Performance, which follows -- has been written by a young Polish professor who teaches American history at the Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej in Lublin. The "telling" aspect of the irony has to do with the seemingly ingrained conservatism which continues to mark the American critical and popular reaction to our own artistic innovators. As Ronald Sukenick recently pointed out during a panel discussion dealing with the influence of Latin American literature on North American writing (at the 1984 MLA Convention in Washington, D.C.), publishers, scholars, and even the reading public in the United States seem far more willing to accept experimentalism in foreign writers than they are in works by

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The Novel as Performance: The Fiction of Ronald Sukenick and Raymond Federman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Crosscurrents/ Modern Critiques/ Third Series vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Introduction xxiii
  • 1 - Aspects of Performance 1
  • 2 - Wallace Stevens: Musing the Obscure 51
  • 3 - In Form: Digressions on the Act of Fiction 61
  • 4 - The Death of the Novel and Other Stories 73
  • 5 - Up 89
  • 6 - Out 99
  • 7 - 98.6 115
  • Part II - Raymond Federman 147
  • 9 - Journey to Chaos: Samuel Beckett's Early Fiction 149
  • 10 - Uncollected Criticism 157
  • 11 - Double or Nothing 175
  • 12 - Take It or Leave It 192
  • 13 - The Voice in the Closet 207
  • 15 - Conclusion: the Fiction Writer on Stage 228
  • Notes Bibliography Index Notes 237
  • Notes 239
  • Bibliography 253
  • Index 273
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