The Revolutionary Spirit Preceding the French Revolution

By Félix Rocquain; J. D. Hunting | Go to book overview

order and economy in the finances, and spoke of his desire to make his people happy in terms that, according to Grimm, moved the whole of Paris to tears. The young Queen, wishing to associate herself with the sentiments of her husband, renounced, in her turn, a right called the "dues of the Queen's girdle." In these initial acts of the reign, men saw the promise of other benefits, and across the pedestal of the statue of Henri IV. some one wrote "Resurrexit."

Nevertheless there were murmurs mingled with the expressions of delight. Some astonishment was felt that, in spite of the assurances of reform, contained in the Royal Edict, the Maupeou Parliament was allowed to remain in office and to congratulate the King upon his accession. This fact was considered a bad omen. The people were no less dissatisfied with the changes that were made in the Ministry. Louis XVI. sent away some of the ministers, whose dismissal was desired -- notably the Duc d'Aiguillon -- but he allowed Maupeou and the Abbé Terray to remain in power. The Nation was impatient to be avenged of the men who so ground it down, and mistrusted promises, which were not endorsed by the discharge of these two ministers and the recall of the old Parliament.

The Archbishop of Paris, and other prelates, represented to the King that, if he recalled the former Parliament, Religion in France would be completely done for. Mistrusting the influence of Marie Antoinette, to whom it attributed the dismissal of the Duc d'Aiguillon, the clerical party tried to alienate from her the King's affections. At table, Louis XVI. found, on his plate, notes containing the words: "Sire, put no trust in the Queen," and attempts were made to persuade him that she was unfaithful. Thus, from the very steps of the Throne, emanated the first attacks on Marie Antoinette -- attacks which were but the precursors of more terrible assaults. At the same time, the clergy strove -- by posting threatening placards and circulating lying scandals against the King -- to set Louis XVI. against the people and the people against him. Between the representations of this cabal, which hemmed him in with its intrigues, and

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Revolutionary Spirit Preceding the French Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 192

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.