SOME QUESTIONS.

TETHERED by ill-health to the South of England, I have, since '89, spent the greater part of the summer of each year in a country house--mostly that of some gentleman-farmer whose family and surroundings fulfilled the needful conditions: one being the presence of young people. Taking, in my daily drives, two ladies as companions, and being generally unable to bear continuous conversations, I put a check on this by asking one or other question not to be answered without thought. The practice thus originated became established, and it has since been my habit to set problems, partly by way of gauging the knowledge of young people and partly by way of exercising their reasoning powers. One of the simplest, which was sometimes answered, is--How happens it that sheep, rabbits, and hares have their eyes on the sides of their heads, while cats and dogs have their eyes nearly in front? Of others, to which the replies are less obvious, and to most of which no answers have been forthcoming, here are a few.

How is it possible for a lark, while soaring, to sing for several minutes without cessation?

What is the reason that in hilly districts the roads

-49-

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Contents vii
  • Facts and Comments. - A Business-Principle 1
  • A Problem. 12
  • A New Americanisms. 16
  • Presence of Mind. 19
  • The Corruption of Music 26
  • Spontaneous Reform. 29
  • Feeling Versus Intellect. 35
  • The Purpose of Art. 44
  • Some Questions. 49
  • The Origin of Music. 52
  • Developed Music 61
  • Estimates of Men. 79
  • State-Education. 82
  • The Closing Hours. 94
  • Style. 97
  • Style Continued. 106
  • Meyerbeer 112
  • The Pursuit of Prettiness. 116
  • Patriotism. 122
  • Some Light on Use-Inheritance. 128
  • Party-Government. 135
  • Exaggerations and Mis-Statements. 145
  • Imperialism and Slavery. 157
  • Re-Barbarization. 172
  • Regimentation. 189
  • Weather Forecasts. 201
  • The Regressive Multiplication Of Causes. 210
  • Sanitation in Theory And Practice. 216
  • Gymnastics. 225
  • Euthanasia. 231
  • The Reform of Company--Law. 234
  • Some Musical Heresies. 245
  • Distinguished Dissenters. 258
  • Barbaric Art. 265
  • Vaccination. 270
  • Perverted History. 274
  • Grammar. 280
  • What Should the Sceptic Say To Believers? 292
  • Ultimate Questions. 300
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