THE ORIGIN OF MUSIC.

FORTY odd years ago I published an essay under the title--" The Origin and Function of Music." The doctrine contained in that essay has been variously criticized, in most cases adversely, both here and abroad. One of the earliest of my critics was Mr. Edmund Gurney, whose reasons for dissent occupied some pages in his work on The Power of Sound, as well as an essay in The Fortnightly Review for July 1876. To his criticisms I replied in a Postscript some few years ago appended to the original essay (see Essays, Library edition, vol. ii, pp. 437- 449). In this Postscript I also dealt with the opposed theory of Mr. Darwin, who ascribes human song, as he ascribes the songs of birds, to the incidents of courtship; and have there, I think, shown the untenability of his hypothesis. I propose here to deal with the hypotheses of several others.

In Mind for July 1891, Dr. Wallaschek, while combating the view elaborated by me, enunciated the view that the essential element in music is rhythm, He says:--

-52-

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Contents vii
  • Facts and Comments. - A Business-Principle 1
  • A Problem. 12
  • A New Americanisms. 16
  • Presence of Mind. 19
  • The Corruption of Music 26
  • Spontaneous Reform. 29
  • Feeling Versus Intellect. 35
  • The Purpose of Art. 44
  • Some Questions. 49
  • The Origin of Music. 52
  • Developed Music 61
  • Estimates of Men. 79
  • State-Education. 82
  • The Closing Hours. 94
  • Style. 97
  • Style Continued. 106
  • Meyerbeer 112
  • The Pursuit of Prettiness. 116
  • Patriotism. 122
  • Some Light on Use-Inheritance. 128
  • Party-Government. 135
  • Exaggerations and Mis-Statements. 145
  • Imperialism and Slavery. 157
  • Re-Barbarization. 172
  • Regimentation. 189
  • Weather Forecasts. 201
  • The Regressive Multiplication Of Causes. 210
  • Sanitation in Theory And Practice. 216
  • Gymnastics. 225
  • Euthanasia. 231
  • The Reform of Company--Law. 234
  • Some Musical Heresies. 245
  • Distinguished Dissenters. 258
  • Barbaric Art. 265
  • Vaccination. 270
  • Perverted History. 274
  • Grammar. 280
  • What Should the Sceptic Say To Believers? 292
  • Ultimate Questions. 300
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