The Mythical Interpretation of the Gospels: Critical Studies in the Historic Narratives

By Thomas James Thorburn | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B
AGNI AND AGNUS.

DOCTOR DREWS labours very hard to equate Agni, as the old Vedic fire-god, with Agnus, the lamb, as sacrificed at the Jewish Passover, which, later, was regarded by the primitive Christians as a type of Jesus Christ. He says ( The Christ Myth, pp. 144 and 145): "In the church of the first [?] century, at Easter, a lamb was solemnly slaughtered upon an altar and its blood collected in a chalice.1

"Accordingly, in the early days of Christianity the comparison of Christ with the light and the lamb was a very favourite one. Above all, the Gospel of John makes the widest use of it. As had already been done in the Vedic cult of Agni, here, too, were identified with Christ the creative word of God [Logos] that had existed before the world, the life, the light, and the lamb. And he was also called 'the light of the world' that came to light up the darkness ruling upon the earth, as well as 'the Lamb of God, who bore the sins of the world.' And, indeed, the Latin expression for lamb (agnus) also expresses its relation to the ancient fire-god and its sanctity as a sacrificial animal. For its root is connected with ignis2 (Sansc., agni,

____________________
1
Reference to Doctor Hatch Hibb. Lects. ( 1888), The Influence of Greek Ideas and Usages upon the Christian Church," p. 300. The authority given by Doctor Hatch is Mabillon, Com. Prœv. ad Ord. Rom.; Musœum Ital. II., XCIV. Mabillon here remarks that the complaint of the Greeks that the pope offered a lamb on the altar at St. Peter's arose from a mistake; the lamb had been roasted for eating and was brought for the papal benediction ( Migne, Patrologia Lat., LXXVIII, 907, 1044). Pope Nicholas I said ( Hardouin, Concilia, V, 309 D) that the story was a lie of the Greeks, and Æneas, Bishop of Paris(ibid.,318 A), says that "only a fool would believe it." Doctor Hatch has evidently been misled if he accepts such a palpably cock-and-bull story as a statement of fact.
2
Italics ours.

-335-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Mythical Interpretation of the Gospels: Critical Studies in the Historic Narratives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 356

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.