Theodore Roosevelt and His Time Shown in His Own Letters - Vol. 1

By Joseph Bucklin Bishop | Go to book overview

what he regarded as essential for the public good; and that in every case, after full consideration of what everybody had to say who might possess full knowledge of the matter, he should have to act finally as his own conscience and judgment dictated and administer the State government as he thought it should be administered. This was reported to Platt and ultimately accepted by him.

While this nomination was pending, the independent organizations of the city of New York, on September 9, put forth a statement in the press declaring that after full consideration they had agreed to offer the nomination for Governor to Roosevelt for the following, among other reasons:

"Mr. Roosevelt's magnificent record makes him the natural candidate for Governor. We need not describe Theodore Roosevelt. Our reasons for nominating him are plain. We think that the evils of our public life can be traced to the exclusive control over nominations by party bosses and their creatures. While Roosevelt is a party man, he is one in whom the masses of the people of both parties feel a confidence amounting to devotion, and who in his person represents independence and reform.

"There is nothing which his mind sees as evil that he would not expose as readily in his own party as in that of his opponents. To have such a man for Governor, with the experience in administration which he possesses, would be of incalculable benefit to the State."

To this declaration there was appended a full state ticket with Roosevelt at its head for Governor and candidates for all other State offices. It was an anti-Republican organization ticket throughout and compelled Roosevelt, if he should accept the nomination, to run as an out-and-out independent candidate without hope of support from the Republican party, and consequently without hope of election. The inevitable result of his candidacy under these conditions would have been the election of the Democratic ticket.

After putting forth their declaration, the Independents took no further action, making no formal nomination of

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