Theodore Roosevelt and His Time Shown in His Own Letters - Vol. 1

By Joseph Bucklin Bishop | Go to book overview

should send to the Senate the name of his chosen candidate on the following morning.

Following closely on the heels of the interview, Roosevelt received a message from Platt's chief agent, asking for an appointment for the evening. Roosevelt named the Union League Club, and the two met there. The agent went over the same ground that Platt had covered, declaring that Platt would never yield, that he was certain to win the fight, that Roosevelt's reputation would be destroyed, and that he wished to save him from such a lamentable smash-up as an ending to his career. Roosevelt repeated his decision, and saying that nothing was to be accomplished by further talk, arose to go away. The agent repeated that it was Roosevelt's last chance, that ruin was ahead of him if he refused it, but that if he accepted everything would be easy. Roosevelt shook his head and answered: "There is nothing to add to what I have already said.""You know it means your ruin?" said the agent. "Well, we will see about that," answered Roosevelt. "You understand," continued the agent, "the fight will begin tomorrow and will be carried to the bitter end.""Yes," replied Roosevelt, as he reached the door, adding "Good night" as he opened it. Before he could pass out, the agent exclaimed: "Hold on! We accept. Send in Blank's name. The Senator is very sorry, but he will make no further opposition."

The name of Roosevelt's candidate was sent to the Senate and confirmation followed. Platt's own account of the incident, as given in his 'Autobiography,' shows that after the struggle was over he was able to take a humorous view of it. Speaking of Roosevelt's "whirlwind fashion of cleaning house" at Albany, he says:

"He threw Superintendent of Insurance Louis F. Payn out of his job so quickly as to send that official to me with a cry: 'I warned you that fellow would soon have you dangling at his chariot wheel. You would not believe me. He has begun by scalping members of your 'Old Guard.' He'll get you, too, soon.'

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