Germany and the Germans from an American Point of View

By Price Collier | Go to book overview

III
THE INDISCREET

THE casual observer of life in England would find himself forced to write of sport, even as in India he would write of caste, as in America he would note the undue emphasis laid upon politics. In Germany, wherever he turns, whether it be to look at the army, to inquire about the navy, to study the constitution, or to disentangle the web of present-day political strife; to read the figures of commercial and industrial progress, or the results of social legislation; to look on at the Germans at play during their yachting week at Kiel, or their rowing contests at Frankfort, he finds himself face to face with the Emperor.

The student visits Berlin, or Potsdam, or Wilhelmshöhe; or with a long stride finds himself on the docks at Hamburg or Bremen, or beside the Kiel Canal, or in Kiel harbor facing a fleet of war-ships; or he lifts his eyes into the air to see a dirigible balloon returning from a voyage of two hundred and fifty miles toward

-105-

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Germany and the Germans from an American Point of View
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • I - THE CRADLE OF MODERN GERMANY 1
  • II - FREDERICK THE GREAT TO BISMARCK 46
  • III - THE INDISCREET 105
  • IV - GERMAN POLITICAL PARTIES AND THE PRESS 156
  • V - BERLIN 211
  • VI - "A LAND OF DAMNED PROFESSORS" 275
  • VII - THE DISTAFF SIDE 335
  • VIII - "OHNE ARMEE KEIN DEUTSCHLAND" 410
  • IX - GERMAN PROBLEMS 461
  • X - "FROM ENVY, HATRED, AND MALICE" 525
  • XI - CONCLUSION 580
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