The Witchcraft Delusion in Colonial Connecticut, 1647-1697

By John M. Taylor | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II

"To deny the possibility, nay actual evidence of witchcraft and sorcery, is at once to flatly contradict the revealed word of God in various passages both of the Old and New Testaments." Blackstone's Commentaries (Vol. 4, ch. 4, p. 60).

"It was simply the natural result of Puritanical teaching acting on the mind, predisposing men to see Satanic influence in life, and consequently eliciting the phenomena of witchcraft." LECKY'S Rationalism in Europe (Vol. I, p. 123).

WITCHCRAFT'S reign in many lands and among many peoples is also attested in its remarkable nomenclature. Consider its range in ancient, medieval and modern thought as shown in some of its definitions: Magic, sorcery, soothsaying, necromancy, astrology, wizardry, mysticism, occultism, and conjuring, of the early and middle ages; compacts with Satan, consorting with evil spirits, and familiarity with the Devil, of later times; all at last ripening into an epidemic demonopathy with its countless victims of fanaticism and error, malevolence and terror, of persecution and ruthless sacrifices.

It is still most potent in its evil, grotesque, and barbaric forms, in Fetichism, Voodooism, Bundooism, Obeahism, and Kahunaism, in the devil and animal ghost worship of the black races, completely exemplified in the arts of the Fetich wizard on the Congo; in the "Uchawi" of the Wasequhha mentioned by Stanley; in the marriage customs of the Soudan devil worshipers; in the practices of

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The Witchcraft Delusion in Colonial Connecticut, 1647-1697
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • TWO INDICTMENTS FOR WITCHCRAFT viii
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 6
  • Chapter III 15
  • Chapter IV 23
  • Chapter V 35
  • Chapter VI 45
  • Chapter VII 62
  • Chater VIII 79
  • Chapter IX 101
  • Chapter X 122
  • Chapter XI 142
  • HISTORICAL NOTE 161
  • BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE 165
  • Index 167
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