The Witchcraft Delusion in Colonial Connecticut, 1647-1697

By John M. Taylor | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI

"The planters of New England were Englishmen, not exempt from English prejudices in favor of English institutions, laws and usages . . . They had not been taught to question the wisdom or the humanity of English criminal law. They were as unconscious of its barbarism, as were the parliaments which had enacted or the courts which dispensed it." Blue Laws, True and False (p. 15), J. HAMMOND TRUMBULL.

"It would seem a marvellous panic, this that shook the rugged reasoners in its iron grasp, and led to such insanity as this displayed toward Alse Young, did we not know that it was but the result of a normal inhuman law confirmed by a belief in the divine, the direct legacy of England, the unquestionable utterance of Church and State." One Blank of Windsor, ANNIE ELIOT TRUMBULL.

THIS brief review of witchcraft in some of its historical aspects, of its spread to the New England colonies, of its rise and suppression in the Connecticut towns, with the citations from the original records which admit no challenge of the facts, may be aptly closed by what is believed to be a complete list of the Connecticut witchcraft cases, authenticated by conclusive evidence of time, place, incident, and circumstance.

Some minor questions may be put, or kept in controversy, as one writer or another, who regards history as a matter of opinion, not of fact, and relying on tradition or hearsay evidence or on superficial investigation, gives a place to guesswork instead of truth, to historical conceits instead of historical verities.

-142-

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The Witchcraft Delusion in Colonial Connecticut, 1647-1697
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • TWO INDICTMENTS FOR WITCHCRAFT viii
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 6
  • Chapter III 15
  • Chapter IV 23
  • Chapter V 35
  • Chapter VI 45
  • Chapter VII 62
  • Chater VIII 79
  • Chapter IX 101
  • Chapter X 122
  • Chapter XI 142
  • HISTORICAL NOTE 161
  • BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE 165
  • Index 167
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