A History of French Commercial Policies

By Frank Arnold Haight | Go to book overview

APPENDIX
STATISTICS OF COLONIAL TRADE

SOME OF THE LATEST statistics of French colonial trade are reproduced in the seven tables in this appendix.

An understanding of their significance will be facilitated by the following comparisons with the trade of other colonial powers which appear in The Colonial Problem,1 a publication of the Royal Institute of International Affairs. The conclusions are based on official statistics of trade values in either 1933 or 1934. In the first comparison France is seen to be the most dependent upon her overseas possessions both as a source of supplies and as a market for national products. Japan is second, followed by the United States and Portugal. The imports from and exports to colonial territories do not exceed 10 per cent of the whole trade of any other power. The second comparison shows that the French colonies, on the other hand, are not so dependent on the mother country for imports or markets as are those of Japan and the United States. The figures for the Belgian and Italian colonies are of about the same order as the French, but for other colonial empires the proportions of trade with the metropole in total colonial trade do not exceed 50 per cent and for the Netherlands East Indies the proportions are only 10 to 20 per cent. In these comparisons the trade of Algeria and the North African Protectorates are included with that of the French colonies. But the data for the British Empire do not include trade with the Dominions and India.

____________________
1
London, 1937, Chap. XV, pp. 287 and 294-5.

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