Note
Biography: John Dome, 1571/2-1632. Descended on his mother's side from John Rastell, brother-in-law of Sir Thomas More, Donne was a nephew of Ellis and Jasper Heywood and was brought up as a recusant. He and his brother Henry entered Hart Hall, Oxford, in 1584 before their age required them to take the Oath of Supremacy. Donne formed a life-long friendship with Sir Henry Wotton at the university, left without a degree, and studied law at Thavies Inn, 1591, and Lincoln's Inn from 1592. He went on the Cadiz expedition of 1596 and the Islands Voyage of 1597, and was Sir Thomas Egerton's secretary until 1601, when Donne's secret marriage to Anne More brought disgrace. He travelled in France and Germany with Sir Robert Drury in 1611-12, was ordained in 1615, became Dean of St. Paul's in 1621 and Vicar of St. Dunstan's in 1624. He preached his sermon on Death's Duel a month before his own death.
Works. Most of Donne's poems were unprinted in his lifetime, but were circulated in manuscript; the collected edition of 1633 is incomplete. Many of the lyrics, love elegies, satires and epigrams, and some of the letters, were composed before his marriage; most of the occasional poems, verse letters, and religious poems were written before his ordination.
Modern Editions. The authoritative text from which quotations are taken in the following chapter, is Sir H. J. C. Grierson's ( 2 vols., 1912; revised 1958), which provides an account of the manuscripts, and an important critical preface. Helen Gardner has edited the Divine Poems ( 1952). There are single-volume editions by Grierson ( 1929) and R. E. Bennett ( 1942).
Scholarship and Criticism. E. Gosse Life and Letters ( 2 vols., 1899) was amply corrected by F. P. Wilson ( Review of English Studies, 1927), I. A. Shapiro ( Times Literary Supplement, 1930, 1932), H. W. Garrod ( TLS, 1944), W. Milgate ( Notes & Queries, 1946). New facts are in R. C. Bald Donne and the Drurys ( 1959). A Garland for John Donne ( 1931) has some important contributions by various authors. Helen Gardner has an essential essay on 'The Argument about The Extasie' in Elizabethan and Jacobean Studies presented to F. P. Wilson ( 1959). Of special interest is Rosemary Freeman English Emblem Books ( 1948). The best comprehensive modern study is J. B. Leishman The Monarch of Wit ( 1951). Sir Geoffrey Keynes' Bibliography ( 1932.) contains much important information both about Donne's own works, and books and articles about him: it is an essential tool for the study of this author.

-202-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Elizabethan Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • List of Plates 6
  • Preface 7
  • Note 10
  • I - The Sonnet from Wyatt to Shakespeare 11
  • Note 30
  • II - Collections of Songs and Sonnets 31
  • Note 52
  • III - Italian and Italianate Poetry 53
  • Note 70
  • IV - A Reading of 'The Ocean's Love to Cynthia' 71
  • Note 90
  • V - Spenser's Pursuit of Fame 91
  • Note 110
  • VI - Sir Philip Sidney and his Poetry 111
  • Note 130
  • VII - Words and Music 131
  • Note 150
  • VIII - The Cave of Mammon 151
  • Note 174
  • IX - Men like Satyrs 175
  • Note 202
  • X - The Poetry of John Donne 203
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 226

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.