Safety Net: Welfare and Social Security, 1929-1979

By Blanche D. Coll | Go to book overview

5
An Orphan Program

LITTLE NOTICED during the framing of the Social Security Act, more or less slipped in to round things out, then funded on a less comprehensive basis than Old Age Assistance or Aid to the Blind, the program for Aid to Dependent Children continued in relative obscurity during the shakedown years when support for the elderly emerged as the dominant issue. The Social Security Board agreed with the BPA that excessive attention to the needs of the aged led to disregard of the needs of children. The observation was true as far as it went. If most of the available money went to the aged, funds to care for the many needy children would be insufficient. But the root of the matter lay elsewhere. Unlike the aged, children did not vote, held no property, and made but trifling purchases. Children could not, on their own, form a powerful competing constituency.

In the overwhelming number of cases, a child had one or two adults responsible for his or her support, adults who, if unemployed, were eligible for unemployment compensation or public works jobs. ADC was designed to cover the unusual cases--according to the act, children "deprived of parental support or care by reason of the death, continued absence from the home, or physical or mental incapacity of a parent." To be sure, this special group of children had some adult backing--women's organizations, child welfare agencies, and on the federal level, the Children's Bureau. But compared with the old folks lobby, this was minuscule.1

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Safety Net: Welfare and Social Security, 1929-1979
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - This Business of Relief 1
  • 2 - From the Cradle to the Grave 34
  • 3 - Planning Welfare Programs 54
  • 4 - The Unsettling Question 80
  • 5 - An Orphan Program 103
  • 6 - The Main Stem 124
  • 7 - The Safety Net 149
  • 8 - The Welfare Mess 176
  • 9 - More Than a Salvage Operation 205
  • 10 - Workfare 239
  • 11 - Welfare Reform 257
  • 12 - To End Welfare as We Know it 277
  • Notes 289
  • Bibliography 319
  • Index 331
  • About the Author 348
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.