Safety Net: Welfare and Social Security, 1929-1979

By Blanche D. Coll | Go to book overview

11
Welfare Reform

THE ELECTION OF 1968 had been a cliff-hanger--Richard M. Nixon, the moderate Republican, against Hubert H. Humphrey, the liberal Democrat, with a third party contender, the conservative George C. Wallace. Fortified with standard Republican principles--a shift of power from Washington to the states, law and order in the cities, workfare for welfare, and vague hints about peace in Vietnam, Nixon won, but without a clear mandate. The Democrats continued to control Congress: in the House, 243- 192; in the Senate, 58-42.1


The Family Assistance Plan

Even as the Republicans assumed control of the executive branch, the poverty issue emerged anew, this time as a "hunger" issue. The prevalence of hunger was never estimated with any exactitude, but unquestionably, in poor areas of the country and in rich areas with poor people in them, hunger and malnutrition existed. Robert Kennedy invoked this issue during his tragically aborted run for the Democratic nomination in 1968, various television specials supplied drama, and Senator George McGovern of South Dakota (to be the Democratic nominee for President in 1972) kept the matter alive during Nixon's first term.2

Nixon was inclined to attack hunger and, to the greatest extent feasible, even poverty, with food stamps and surplus commodities--relief in kind à

-257-

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Safety Net: Welfare and Social Security, 1929-1979
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - This Business of Relief 1
  • 2 - From the Cradle to the Grave 34
  • 3 - Planning Welfare Programs 54
  • 4 - The Unsettling Question 80
  • 5 - An Orphan Program 103
  • 6 - The Main Stem 124
  • 7 - The Safety Net 149
  • 8 - The Welfare Mess 176
  • 9 - More Than a Salvage Operation 205
  • 10 - Workfare 239
  • 11 - Welfare Reform 257
  • 12 - To End Welfare as We Know it 277
  • Notes 289
  • Bibliography 319
  • Index 331
  • About the Author 348
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