Structural Geology for Petroleum Geologists

By William L. Russell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 15
DATING STRUCTURAL EVENTS

A knowledge of the time of formation of the structural features of a region is needed to build up a clear conception of its geologic history. The geologic history of an area would include information about the paleogeography and its changes, regional and local uplifts and depressions, erosion, deposition, faulting, tilting, and the development of climate and types of life. The portion of geologic history which is most important to petroleum geologists deals with the order of development of the structural features, the deposition of the formations, and the accumulation of oil and gas. In the discussions of the various subjects which have preceded this chapter there have been brief descriptions of the methods of dating various features. The importance of the subject justifies gathering information on this subject together in one short chapter.


ABSOLUTE DATING

When a geologist speaks of dating a structural event, he generally has in mind determining its age relative to the associated stratigraphic units or structural features. The age and duration of the various world-wide time units since the beginning of the Cambrian can be given fairly accurately in millions of years, but the petroleum geologist is generally more interested in the order of occurrence of the events. It is this order of occurrence which is related to the oil and gas prospects, and if the order of events were unchanged, the oil and gas prospects would probably not be much affected if the age in millions of years were considerably increased or decreased.


METHODS AND AIDS TO RELATIVE DATING

Topographic Methods. The age of structural features formed late in geologic time may in some cases be approximated by studying the topography. The degree of dissection of a fault scarp is a rough measure of its age. Very young anticlines are likely to conform rather closely to the topography. In some cases topographic relief is produced by structural deformation, and this topography is buried by sediments before it can be destroyed by erosion. The nature of this buried topography gives a rough indication of the length of time between the formation of the struc-

-351-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Structural Geology for Petroleum Geologists
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 432

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.