The Bighorn of Death Valley

By Florence B. Welles | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Here are the names of some of the people without whose help this survey and this report would not have been made. On behalf of "Old Mama," "The Hook," "Little Fuzzy," and all the other bighorn in the world, we would like to express appreciation to the following:

Principal Biologist Lowell Sumner, of the National Park Service, without whose wisdom, encouragement, constant support, and editorial assistance this study might not have progressed beyond its initial stages; Dorr Yeager, without whose sponsorship we might never have been in the National Park Service at all; Regional Director Lawrence C. Merriam and Regional Chief of Interpretation Bennett T. Gale for that often intangible but always necessary acceptance which can be found only in "the Region"; Assistant Director, Public Affairs, Daniel B. Beard, himself a biologist, who actively supported and made possible the publication of this report.

Former Superintendent Fred Binnewies, without whose support this study would never have become an official National Park Service project and would have bogged down at Badwater; and Superintendent Granville B. Liles, who carried on where Fred left off.

Park Planner C. Gordon Fredine, through whose efforts the Desert Bighorn Council was established.

Former Chief Ranger Lou Hallock for his work with the 1955 census.

Ranger Matt Ryan for his intelligent inquiring mind, his faithful reports, and his enormous energy, without which we might still know nothing about Twin Springs and Blackwater. And to Rosemary a special necklace of "black pearls."

Bob and Besse Carr for their steady hand at the tiller through the turbulent fiscal seas.

All the National Park Service staff, with special thanks for assistance beyond the call of duty to Park Naturalist Bill Bullard, Ranger- Naturalists Dave Ochsner, Ro Wauer, Ed Menning, Bob Badaracco; Rangers Lee Shackleton and Tom Monroe; and Mike Fahrner, who told us that the Badwater bighorn had finally after 6 years returned to "eating the softer rocks" at Badwater Bay.

The many geologists of the U.S. Geological Survey, whose reports from the back country have filled so many gaps in this story--Hal

-v-

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The Bighorn of Death Valley
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Summary xi
  • Introduction - How and Why this Study was Begun 1
  • Life History of the Death Valley Bighorn 15
  • Status for the Future 181
  • Selected Bibliography 189
  • Photographs 197
  • Index 239
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