Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton

By John Brumm Lewis | Go to book overview

INDUCTION ADDRESS

HON. VICTOR M. GORE, B.S., LL.B. Regent of the University of Michigan

The people of the State of Michigan dedicated this University to the cause of higher education. That means it was dedicated to the progress of knowledge as well as the care and culture of men and women. To preserve it unimpaired to future generations it was given lodgment in our State Constitution. There it remains in security and strength. It is, therefore, a part and parcel of the government itself. It is preëminently of the people. We owe a debt of gratitude to the electors of 1850 who answered in the affirmative this question: Will a free people tax themselves for higher education? That plendid verdict meant that growth, and ever larger growth for the institution, awaited the coming years. Progress has become its breath of life. Under wise and wholesome leadership the University has grown in efficient strength until to-day the friends of education the world over join us in cheering its past achievements and welcoming its future and its problems. The University has thus justified the faith and leveled up to the ideals of its founders. It has produced in gratifying abundance noble men and noble women, and that is the true measure of its service and glory.

Michigan may well be proud of its presidents. From the first they have been uniformly able men. Upon every tongue to-day are the names of Tappan and Haven, Angell and Hutchins. These inspiring names span Michigan history like a bow of promise. They are forever linked

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Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton
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