Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton

By John Brumm Lewis | Go to book overview

THE FUNCTIONS OF THE STATE UNIVERSITY

MARION LEROY BURTON, PH.D., LL.D. President of the University of Michigan

The University of Michigan has a notable history. Its past is the occasion of just pride in the heart of every citizen of the state. The name of President James Burrill Angell is permanently identified with educational statesmanship in America. The University to-day, its faculties and students, its buildings and campus, give ample proof of the wise and sagacious leadership of President Hutchins during the last decade. Since 1837 this University has filled a vital place in American education. For a generation its primacy among the state universities of our country was conceded. That several highly important educational developments were initiated here is obvious to all who are familiar with the history of higher learning in America.

This University was founded and has been maintained by the State of Michigan. It therefore owes primary obligations to this state. However large it may become, or however attractive it may prove to students from all quarters of the globe, it finds its chief satisfaction in serving its own constituency. Nevertheless it shares with all of the colleges and universities of the land, represented here to-day, many common tasks of higher education. It counts it a rare honor to be numbered among these institutions.

The aims and functions of a true university, by the very nature and terms of the problem, defy definition. Even so, it is our privilege, upon occasions such as this, to

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Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton
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