Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton

By John Brumm Lewis | Go to book overview

THE COST OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND ITS BEARING ON TAXATION

SAMUEL P. CAPEN, PH.D. Director of the American Council on Education

Two years and a half ago the higher institutions of the United States were threatened with virtual extinction as the result of the plans for mobilizing the man power of the country. They were saved by being incorporated in the mobilization machinery. The normal processes of higher education were thereby suspended or distorted. College officers underwent much mental suffering, the memory of which still rankles. In some cases physical damage was done to university equipment which has thus far been only partially repaired. Higher institutions made extraordinary contributions both directly and indirectly to the war effort of the United States; directly by involuntarily converting themselves into training centers for the military forces, indirectly through the indispensable services rendered by their sons and daughters in the field, in scientific investigation and in administrative undertakings. One aspect of these contributions has been little dwelt upon, but is worthy of note. Whereas nearly every other agency that furnished the Government with either human or material products, contracted to do so on the cost plus basis, the college contracts were cost minus contracts. I am sure that all members of the fellowship of scholars are glad and proud that this was so. The idealism for which universities stand received a new demonstration. They, at least, reaped no profits from the nation's emergency. But although the universities themselves have not boasted of their sacrifice, it should not be

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Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton
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