Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton

By John Brumm Lewis | Go to book overview

DIFFERENTIATION OF THE UNITS OF THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM TO MEET THE NEEDS OF VARYING TYPES OF STUDENTS

CHARUS A. PROSSER, PH.D. Director of The William Hood Dunwoody Institute

Modern society has become self-conscious of its weaknesses and its possibilities, and is deliberately planning to control its own environment and shape its own destiny. Of no people is this so true as of our own country. The causes for the growth of this conscious and deliberate constructive spirit are many.

We have become keenly sensitive to human incapacity, suffering, and waste. Experience, verified by scientific knowledge and investigation, has given us a guilty knowledge, from which we cannot escape, of the causes and the remedies for human shortcomings and social defects.

Swelling social resources provide the means to promote through collective action a widening social program of human betterment. Finally, science has furnished the tested knowledge in many fields that can be applied in many ways and through various agencies to the improvement of social conditions and the advancement of social well-being.

These causes and this constructive spirit had already brought, even before the Great War, the breakdown of faith in older customs, as well as doctrines, and a period of transition in our institutional life which the European conflict has made a demand, constantly growing more articulate, for readjustment.

The readjustment will be made, as it has already been made in some unhappy nations on the Continent, by

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Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton
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