Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton

By John Brumm Lewis | Go to book overview

THE ART OF EXAMINATION

A. LAWRENCE LOWELL PH.D., LL.D. President of Harvard University

We have met here not only to participate in the inauguration of Mr. Burton as the new President of the University of Michigan, and to express our hope and confidence in the future of that great institution; but also to take an account of stock in the educational progress of the nation. Everyone will admit that the present condition of of education in this country has its merits and its defects. The product of our schools and colleges shows a remarkable degree of resourcefulness and adaptability. This may not be wholly due to our educational system, but in part to the environment, which tends to develop these qualities in our people; for they are shown also by men whose systematic education has been exceedingly limited. Nevertheless, it is easy to underrate the effects of schooling. Men often attribute far too little to their instruction, and too much to their own inherent qualities. It is certain not only that our education has not tended to diminish natural resourcefulness and adaptability, but that these very traits have been shown most markedly among college-bred men, as was seen among our college graduates in the late war. The two qualities of resourcefulness and adaptability have been, indeed, those that we have most needed in the past. They have been absolutely essential for the great American achievement, unparalleled in so short a period, of bringing under cultivation a vast wilderness, of developing the mines and other natural resources of a continent, and of developing

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Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton
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