Lincoln Day by Day: A Chronology, 1809-1865 - Vol. 2

By William E. Baringer; Earl Schenck Miers | Go to book overview

continue hearings. Date of departure cannot be determined, but it was probably during this week. Illinois Reports, 1853, No. 9.

DECEMBER 15. [Supreme Court begins its session in Springfield with Justices Treat and Trumbull on bench. Register, Dec. 16. Justice Caton does not arrive from Ottawa until night. "The different wagons he rode in on the trip down broke down seven times and a Troy coach upset with him, injuring his head badly."Ibid., Dec. 18.]

DECEMBER 17. Springfield. Lincoln and Johnston reach Springfield, where adjourned canal hearings resume Dec. 20. Ibid., Dec. 20.

DECEMBER 20. Lincoln and Johnston resume hearings, "and will continue . . . probably two weeks."Ibid.

DECEMBER 31. Lincoln deposits $3.31 cash at Robert Irwin's, probably to balance his account. Irwin Ledger.


1853

JANUARY 3. Springfield. [Legislature convenes for regular session.]

JANUARY 5. Lincoln and Doughty withdraw their plea in Norton v. Gorden, before U.S. Circuit Court July 8, 1852, and defendant defaults. Plaintiff is awarded $1,068.39 debt and $641.92 damages. Logan is attorney for plaintiff. In Supreme Court, Casey v. Casey, appeal from Jefferson County, is set for hearing tomorrow. Record.

JANUARY 6. Scates commences argument for plaintiff in Casey v. Casey, bill in chancery to set aside transfer of inheritance on ground of fraud. Lower court entered decree in accordance with bill. Scates, Logan, and Lincoln represent plaintiff, Nelson defendant. Ibid.

JANUARY 7. Scates continues his argument in Casey v. Casey. He is followed by Nelson for defendant. Ibid. Lincoln and Johnston submit report of investigation of Illinois and Michigan Canal claims to legislature. Lincoln also presents his account--$65 for travel and four dollars a day for 21 days service. Illinois Reports, 1853, No. 9; CW, II, 162-87.

JANUARY 8. Nelson concludes argument for defense in Casey v. Casey. Record.

JANUARY 10. Lincoln concludes for plaintiff in Casey v. Casey. Lincoln writes Gov. Matteson recommending pardon for William D. Davis, sen-

-90-

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Lincoln Day by Day: A Chronology, 1809-1865 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Advisory Committee iv
  • Lincoln Sesquicentennial Commission v
  • Location Symbols vii
  • Abbreviation of Sources viii
  • 1849 3
  • 1851 46
  • 1852 67
  • 1854 90
  • 1855 136
  • 1857 187
  • 1859 207
  • Glossary of Legal Terms 305
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