A History of American Baptist Missions in Asia, Africa, Europe and North America

By William A. M. Gammell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII.

WAR between the Burmars and the English. -- Capture of Rangoon. -- Perils of Messirs. Hough and Wade, and their Families. -- Advance of the English towards Ava. -- Imprisonment of the Missionaries there. -- Their removal to Oung-pen-la. -- Their protracted Sufferings. -- Heroic Services of Mrs. Judson. -- Liberation of the Missionaries. -- Their Agency in Negotiations with the English. -- Reception of Mr. and Mrs. Judson by Sir Archibald Campbell. -- Their return to Rangoon. -- The Mission removed to Amherst. -- Mr. Judson joins the English Embassy to Ava. -- Death of Mrs. Judson.

THE war which now broke out between the Burman government and that of the English in Bengal, forms an important era in the history of the mission. Its first effect was to put an end to the labors of the missionaries, and to involve them in unspeakble sufferings; yet, in accordance with a mysterious though beneficent law of human affairs, its ultimate issues have undoubtedly proved favorable, not only to the interests of our own particular mission, but also to the further extension of Christian civilization among the thickly-peopled countries of eastern India. The war had its origin in feuds which had long existed on the frontiers of Chittagong. They were such as commonly spring up along the borders of opposite and neighboring jurisdictions, but were rendered unusually violent among the Burmans by their jealousy of the wide extension of British power. Some criminals and disaffected persons had escaped from the Barman territory to that of Chittagong, where, as was alleged, they were protected by the English government. The king, exasperated by the troubles which he thus experienced, and counting on the rising of several of the neighboring provinces that wished to throw off the British yoke, raised an army of thirty thousand men, under Bandula, his greatest warrior, and was preparing to make war on the governor-general, whom he felt sure of bringing speedily to the terms he desired. In this state of affairs the English determined to anticipate the Burman invasion, and to avail themselves of the advantage of beginning the war, which it was thought could now no longer be averted.

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A History of American Baptist Missions in Asia, Africa, Europe and North America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • CERTIFICATE. iii
  • PREFACE. v
  • Contents vii
  • MISSIONS IN BURMAH. 1
  • Chapter II 8
  • Chapter III 17
  • Chapter IV 24
  • Chapter V 35
  • Chapter VI 45
  • Chapter VII 56
  • Chapter VIII 66
  • Chapter IX 79
  • Chapter X 91
  • Chapter XI 104
  • Chapter XII 114
  • Chapter XIII 133
  • Chapter XIV 150
  • Chapter XV 173
  • MISSIONS IN SIAM AND CHINA. 187
  • MISSION IN ASSAM. 210
  • MISSION AMONG THE TELOOGOOS. 228
  • MISSION IN WESTERN AFRICA. 243
  • MISSION IN FRANCE 265
  • MISSION IN GERMANY AND DENMARK. - CHAPTER XXI. 278
  • MISSION IN GREECE. 299
  • MISSIONS AMONG THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA. 313
  • Chapter XXIV 330
  • APPENDIX. 349
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