Our Country: Its Possible Future and Its Present Crisis

By Josiah Strong | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION.

THIS is a powerful book. It needs no introduction from other sources than its own. Its great strength lies in its facts. These are collated with rare skill, and verified by the testimony of men and of documents whose witness is authority. The book will speak for itself to every man who cares enough for the welfare of our country to read it, and who has intelligence enough to take in its portentous story.

It is worthy of note that almost all the thinking which thinking men have given to the subject for the last fifty years has been in the line of the leading idea which this volume enforces-- the idea of crisis in the destiny of this country, and through it in the destiny of the world. The common sense of men puts into homely phrase the great principles which underlie great enterprises. One such phrase lies under the Christian civilization of our land. It is "the nick of time." The present hour is, and always has been, "the nick of time" in our history. The principle which underlies all probationary experience comes to view in organized society with more stupendous import than in individual destiny. This book puts the evidence of that in a form of cumulative force which is overwhelming.

Fifty years ago our watchful fathers discerned it in their forecast of the future of the Republic. The wisest among them even then began to doubt how long the original stock of American society could bear the interfusion of elements alien to our history and to the faith of our ancestry. The conviction was then often expressed that the case was hopeless on any

-iii-

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Our Country: Its Possible Future and Its Present Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Prefatory Note. ii
  • INTRODUCTION. iii
  • Contents viii
  • Chapter I. The Time Factor in the Problem. 1
  • Chapter Iii. Western Supremacy. 7
  • Chapter Iv. Perils--Immigration. 30
  • Chapter Vi. Perils.--Mormonism. 46
  • Chapter Vii. Perms.--Intemperance. 59
  • Chapter Viii. Perils.--Socialism. 68
  • Chapter Ix. Perils.--Wealth. 85
  • Chapter X. Perils.--The City. 112
  • Chapter Xi. The Influence of Early Settlers. 128
  • Chapter Xii. The Exhaustion of the Public Lands. 144
  • Chapter Xiii. The Anglo-Saxon and the World's Future. 159
  • INDEX. 223
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