Our Country: Its Possible Future and Its Present Crisis

By Josiah Strong | Go to book overview

To-day England herself is successfully rivaled by American productions in her own markets."* But the comparison does not end here. Ten years in the New West are, in their results, fully equal to half a century east of the Mississippi. There is there a tremendous rush of events which is startling, even in the nineteenth century. That western world in its progress is gathering momentum like a falling body. Vast regions have been settled before, but never before under the mighty whip and spur of electricity and steam. Referring to the development of the West, the London Times remarks: "Unquestionably, this is the most important fact in contemporary history. It is a new fact, it can not be compared with any cognate phenomenon in the past." And, as it is without a precedent, so it will remain without a parallel, for there are no more New Worlds.


CHAPTER II.
NATIONAL RESOURCES.

IT is necessary to the argument to show that the United States is capable of sustaining a vast population.

The fathers on Massachusetts Bay once decided that population was never likely to be very dense west of Newton (a suburb of Boston), and the founders of Lynn,

____________________
*
To-day in America, 1881.

-7-

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Our Country: Its Possible Future and Its Present Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Prefatory Note. ii
  • INTRODUCTION. iii
  • Contents viii
  • Chapter I. The Time Factor in the Problem. 1
  • Chapter Iii. Western Supremacy. 7
  • Chapter Iv. Perils--Immigration. 30
  • Chapter Vi. Perils.--Mormonism. 46
  • Chapter Vii. Perms.--Intemperance. 59
  • Chapter Viii. Perils.--Socialism. 68
  • Chapter Ix. Perils.--Wealth. 85
  • Chapter X. Perils.--The City. 112
  • Chapter Xi. The Influence of Early Settlers. 128
  • Chapter Xii. The Exhaustion of the Public Lands. 144
  • Chapter Xiii. The Anglo-Saxon and the World's Future. 159
  • INDEX. 223
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