Our Country: Its Possible Future and Its Present Crisis

By Josiah Strong | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII.
THE ANGLO-SAXON AND THE WORLD'S FUTURE.*

EVERY race which has deeply impressed itself on the human family has been the representative of some great idea--one or more--which has given direction to the nation's life and form to its civilization. Among the Egyptians this seminal idea was life, among the Persians it was light, among the Hebrews it was purity, among the Greeks it was beauty, among the Romans it was law. The Anglo-Saxon is the representative of two great ideas, which are closely related. One of them is that of civil liberty. Nearly all of the civil liberty in the world is enjoyed by Anglo-Saxons: the English, the British colonists, and the people of the United States. To some, like the Swiss, it is permitted by the sufferance of their neighbors; others, like the French, have experimented with it; but, in modern times, the peoples whose love of liberty has won it, and whose genius for self-government has preserved it, have been Anglo-Saxons. The noblest races have always been lovers of liberty. That love ran strong in early German blood, and has profoundly influenced the institutions of all the branches of the great German family; but it was left for the Anglo-Saxon branch fully to recognize the right of the individual to himself, and formally to declare it the foundation stone of government.

The other great idea of which the Anglo-Saxon is the

____________________
*
It is only just to say that the substance of this chapter was given to the public as a lecture some three years before the appearance of Prof. Fiske "Manifest Destiny", in Harper's Magazine, for March, 1885, which contains some of the same ideas.

-159-

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Our Country: Its Possible Future and Its Present Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Prefatory Note. ii
  • INTRODUCTION. iii
  • Contents viii
  • Chapter I. The Time Factor in the Problem. 1
  • Chapter Iii. Western Supremacy. 7
  • Chapter Iv. Perils--Immigration. 30
  • Chapter Vi. Perils.--Mormonism. 46
  • Chapter Vii. Perms.--Intemperance. 59
  • Chapter Viii. Perils.--Socialism. 68
  • Chapter Ix. Perils.--Wealth. 85
  • Chapter X. Perils.--The City. 112
  • Chapter Xi. The Influence of Early Settlers. 128
  • Chapter Xii. The Exhaustion of the Public Lands. 144
  • Chapter Xiii. The Anglo-Saxon and the World's Future. 159
  • INDEX. 223
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