Our Country: Its Possible Future and Its Present Crisis

By Josiah Strong | Go to book overview

foreign, young and old, sick and sound, drawn from every rank and condition of life, and, hence, fairly representing the whole people. Dr. Baxter's Official Report shows that our native whites were over an inch taller than the English, and nearly two-thirds of an inch taller than the Scotch, who, in height, were superior to all other foreigners. At the age of completed growth, the Irish, who were the stoutest of the foreigners, surpassed the native whites, in girth of chest, less than a quarter of an inch. Statistics as to weight are meager, but Dr. Baxter remarks that it is perhaps not too much to say that the war statistics show "that the mean weight of the white native of the United States is not disproportionate to his stature." Americans were found to be superior to Englishmen not only in height, but also in chest-measurement and weight. Such facts afford more than a hint that the higher civilization of the future will not lack an adequate physical basis in the people of the United States.

Mr. Darwin is not only disposed to see, in the superior vigor of our people, an illustration of his favorite theory of natural selection, but even intimates that the world's history thus far has been simply preparatory for our future, and tributary to it. He says:* "There is apparently much truth in the belief that the wonderful progress of the United States, as well as the character of the people, are the results of natural selection; for the more energetic, restless, and courageous men from all parts of Europe have emigrated during the last ten or twelve generations to that great country, and have there succeeded best. Looking at the distant future, I do not think that the Rev. Mr. Zincke takes an exaggerated view when he says: 'All

____________________
*
"Descent of Man", Part I., page 142.

-170-

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Our Country: Its Possible Future and Its Present Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Prefatory Note. ii
  • INTRODUCTION. iii
  • Contents viii
  • Chapter I. The Time Factor in the Problem. 1
  • Chapter Iii. Western Supremacy. 7
  • Chapter Iv. Perils--Immigration. 30
  • Chapter Vi. Perils.--Mormonism. 46
  • Chapter Vii. Perms.--Intemperance. 59
  • Chapter Viii. Perils.--Socialism. 68
  • Chapter Ix. Perils.--Wealth. 85
  • Chapter X. Perils.--The City. 112
  • Chapter Xi. The Influence of Early Settlers. 128
  • Chapter Xii. The Exhaustion of the Public Lands. 144
  • Chapter Xiii. The Anglo-Saxon and the World's Future. 159
  • INDEX. 223
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