The Romantic Dream: Wordsworth and the Poetics of the Unconscious

By Douglas B. Wilson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The following generous friends and scholars have read chapters or contributed timely support for my work: J. Robert Barth, S.J., Jonathan Bate, Harold Beaver, James K. Chandler, Ruth El Saffar, William H. Galperin ("opposition is true friendship"), María Antonia Garcés, Eric Gould, Jan Gorak, Anthony J. Harding, Rachel Jacoff, Kenneth R. Johnston, Anne K. Mellor, Bradford K. Mudge, W. J. B. Owen, Janice Haney-Peritz, Jeffrey C. Robinson, Charles Repka, Stuart Sperry, Raymond P. Tripp, and Leon Waldoff. Peter L. Rudnytsky, apart from expert advice on psychoanalytic readings, helped to fine-tune the logic and style of my preface. Professors Stephen C. Behrendt and J. Douglas Kneale, readers for the University of Nebraska Press, made welcome suggestions that leave me deeply in their debt. Special thanks go to Irene Gorak for her astute work on my index, and to Dr. Sarah Disbrow for her adroit copyediting.

I am grateful to the University of Denver for its financial support of my book's publication, for a sabbatical leave, 1988-89, for an index grant, and for a stipend from its Creative Work Fund to do research at the Stanford and Berkeley libraries, 1989. Gerald Chapman, as departmental chair, helped to facilitate these modes of logistical support. I would like to thank Robert Woof and Jonathan Wordsworth, custodians of the Dove Cottage Library in Grasmere, as well as the librarians at Penrose Library (its Interlibrary Loan staff), the British Library, and especially the Stanford libraries.

I am indebted to Carol Taylor of the Faculty Computer Lab at the University of Denver, as well as to R. Daniel Wilzoch, for invaluable support over the technology of my typescript.

My special gratitude goes to both Peter J. Manning and John Paul

-xix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Romantic Dream: Wordsworth and the Poetics of the Unconscious
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 206

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.