The Ballad Tree: A Study of British and American Ballads, Their Folklore, Verse and Music, Together with Sixty Traditional Ballads and Their Tunes

By Evelyn Kendrick Wells | Go to book overview

INDEX OF FIRST LINES
A frog he would a-wooing go 165
A gentleman came to our house 123
Abide, abide, true love, she said 152
All in the merry month of May 114
As I walked out one winter's night 120
As I was a-walking one morning in the spring 213
As it fell out on a bright holiday 188
As the king lay musing on his bed 43
At break of day from frightful dreams 239
Bold Arder went forth one summer morning 35
Brian o' Lyn and his wife and his daughter 167
Christ was born in Bethlehem189
Come all ye bold highwaymen and outlaws of this land 304
Come all you pretty fair maids 272
Come saddle up my fastest steed 118
Come you people old and young 217
God makes sech nights, all white an' still 132
Hangman, hangman, slack up your rope 115
Holiday, holiday, on the very first day of the year 110
I gave my love a cherry that has no stones 175
1 beard a bonnie cow low 141
1 married me a wife, I got her home 121
1 may synge of a may 200
I sowed the seeds of love 271
1 want you to make me a cambric shirt 172
If you can't answer my questions nine 169
In somer, when þe shawes be sheyne 25
It was in Judah's land 192
It's of a fearless highwayman a story I will tell (Brennan on the Moor) 300
It's of a fearless highwayman a story I will tell (Quantrell) 302
It's of a sea captain that ploughs the salt sea 156
Jack of the Feather's out again 348
Last night there were four Maries 48
Lord Lovel he stood at his castle gate 108
Nay, Iuy, hyt shal not be, iwys 198
No stir in the air, no stir in the sea 330
Now Liddesdale has ridd'n a raid 69
O, the devil he came to the farmer one day 122
O young Lochinvar is come out of the west 329
Oh Mother, Oh Mother, come riddle to me 106
Ob, she looked out of the window 168
Oh, where have you been this live-long day 166
One morning, one morning, one morning in May 222
Others they may tell you of bold Robin Hood39
Proud Maisie is in the wood 330
Queen Jane was in labor six weeks and some more 47
She laid herself all against the oak 150
Sweet William rode up to Fair Ellen's gate 147
The cuckoo is a pretty bird 274

-365-

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