V
THE PRICE OF VICTORY IN FRANCE

I

AFTER the clay of armistice in 1918 the French people were filled with the intoxication of victory. The faith with which they had fought had been fulfilled. It was the faith that, in spite of the immense power of the Germans, their military supremacy at the beginning of the war in man power and machine power and the crippling blows they inflicted on France in the first rush and afterward, they would be beaten in the end, beaten to the dust, by the heroism of the French armies, the genius of French generals, and the unconquerable spirit of the French.

"On les aura!" ("We shall have them!") was the cry of France even in days when the enemy was sprawled over their northern provinces, when they struck close to the heart of Paris, and when masses of French troops reeled back from their frightful onslaughts.

It is true, as I know, that at times this faith in ultimate victory burned low in the hearts of some French men and women whose souls were staggered by the enormous and unceasing slaughter of their youth, and by the narrow, hair-breadth line which sometimes stood between the safety and the death of France--as when the Germans reached the Marne in August of the first year, and again after years of infernal struggle which strewed the fields of France with death, in July, 1918. But the hope never flickered out into absolute despair,

-175-

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • I- Leaders of the Old Tradition 1
  • II- Ideals of the Humanists 50
  • III- The Need of the Spirit 83
  • IV- The New Germany 127
  • V- The Price of Victory in France 175
  • VII- The Warning of Austria 244
  • IX- The United States and World Peace 339
  • X- The Chance of Youth 370
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