Chapter 1
WOMEN OF THE WORLD, ARISE!

WOMAN SUFFRAGE is a recent issue in Mexican politics. The traditional lack of concern about political rights for Mexican women was the reflection of a society hardly conscious that such a problem existed. Mexican politics had always been essentially a masculine activity; even among men it was the concern of a small politically active group in which the vast majority took little part. The activities of Mexican women had always been confined mainly to home, family, and Church. To be sure, Mexico has had its share of active and courageous heroines to play vital and dramatic roles at every stage in its crisis-filled history, but until recently neither men nor women seriously considered the possibility of women participating equally with men in national politics. The nineteenth-century feminist movements in Europe and the United States produced only faint echoes in Mexico. No Mexican counterparts of Susan B. Anthony or Mrs. Henry Fawcett emerged in Porfirian Mexico to attract a great national following and lead a crusade for women's rights to the accompaniment of dramatic and even scandalous headlines in the newspapers.

The Constitution of 1857 did not explicitly exclude women from voting and holding office, but the election laws restricted the suffrage to males, and in practice women did not participate nor demand a part in politics. Señorita Manzanera del Campo, in a recent study of political rights, correctly summed up the viewpoint of politicians under the 1857 charter: "It is indisputable that the attitude of the legislature under the Constitution of 1857 was one of indifference with respect to the feminine element of our country."1 Early in the reign of don Porfirio a few small socialist journals

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Woman Suffrage in Mexico
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter 1 - WOMEN OF THE WORLD, ARISE! 1
  • Chapter 2 - WHO SPEAKS FOR THE WOMEN OF MEXICO? 5
  • Chapter 3 - CÁRDENAS, CHAMPION OF WOMEN'S RIGHTS 16
  • Chapter 4 - THE BEST LAID PLANS . . . 39
  • Chapter 5 - FIRST FEMININE VICTORY 50
  • Chapter 6 - POLITICALLY EQUAL 61
  • Chapter 7 - FEMININE POLITICS IN PRACTICE 85
  • Chapter 8 - THE LADY AND THE BALLOT 115
  • Notes 135
  • Bibliography 147
  • Index 151
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 164

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.