Chapter 7
FEMININE POLITICS IN PRACTICE

MEXICO HAS HAD only two general elections since the triumph of the long and painful process of constitutional and legal reform by which women gained equal political rights in 1952-1953. One state, however, Baja California Norte, held a special election in July, 1954, at the conclusion of the process of admission to the union as a new state. In this, its first state election, women participated equally with men in choosing a governor, a local legislature, and three members to Congress: two senators and one deputy. The local PRI, with the approval of headquarters in Mexico City, nominated Señora Licenciada Aurora Jiménez de Palacios, a locally prominent woman lawyer, as its candidate for deputy. Señora Jiménez de Palacios, a sincere and intelligent young woman, 28 years of age and the mother of three children, campaigned vigorously through the state advocating support of President Ruiz Cortines, equal sacrifices for all in adjusting to inflation, and better educational opportunities for the children of Baja California. Her candidacy proved so popular that the PP, the PRI's only opposition in the election, permitted her to run unopposed. Since the PRI, as had been generally anticipated, won all the seats in Congress, Señora Aurora Jiménez became the first woman member of the Mexican Congress, but only for the third year of the XLII Congress.1 The legislative period of this session lasted only from September through December, 1954, although her term of office did not end until August, 1955. With the lines of control in Congress already formed and a short legislative term doña Aurora had little opportunity to gain any power as a legislative or political leader, although she served faithfully and with at least as much distinction as the average national deputy.

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Woman Suffrage in Mexico
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter 1 - WOMEN OF THE WORLD, ARISE! 1
  • Chapter 2 - WHO SPEAKS FOR THE WOMEN OF MEXICO? 5
  • Chapter 3 - CÁRDENAS, CHAMPION OF WOMEN'S RIGHTS 16
  • Chapter 4 - THE BEST LAID PLANS . . . 39
  • Chapter 5 - FIRST FEMININE VICTORY 50
  • Chapter 6 - POLITICALLY EQUAL 61
  • Chapter 7 - FEMININE POLITICS IN PRACTICE 85
  • Chapter 8 - THE LADY AND THE BALLOT 115
  • Notes 135
  • Bibliography 147
  • Index 151
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