An Introduction to Family Therapy: Systemic Theory and Practice

By Rudi Dallos; Ros Draper | Go to book overview

8 Reflections and critique 2005

In this final chapter we want to pull together some of the threads that connect different approaches in systemic therapy but also to make some connections to other therapies. In addition, we want to indulge in some crystal ball gazing to consider possible developments in the twenty-first century. Reviewing the literature, we find the following statements in The Book of Family Therapy (Mendelsohn and Napier 1972) which, in our opinion, could just as easily have been written in 2005:

Family therapists are a curious and distinctive breed among
mental health professionals. They have broken down a number of
professional taboos, especially concerning secrecy, and they
practise openness, direct observation of therapy and give each
other live supervision, the sharing of experiences, and they treat
people as persons rather than as patients. Mavericks that they
are, they are relatively unconcerned with the formal degrees
[family therapists] have, they tend to practise what they preach
and are relatively frank about their own family struggles, thereby
decreasing the usual distance between the professional and seeker
of help. Family therapists have strong convictions about the
validity of their work and firmly believe they’re where the action’s
really at.

While in 2005 colleagues would say that family therapy and systemic practice are part of the mental health establishment, there is, in our view, still a maverick element. Committing ourselves to being influenced by feedback and listening collaboratively means we are constantly and publicly demonstrating our own process of change. Another reason for systemic practice probably remaining the chosen modality for a minority of therapists is the sheer complexity and emotional

-231-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Introduction to Family Therapy: Systemic Theory and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • An Introduction to Family Therapy - Systemic Theory and Practice iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Figures xi
  • Notes on the Authors xii
  • Preface xiii
  • Foreword xvi
  • Acknowledgements xix
  • Dedication and Acknowledgements xx
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: The First Phase – 1950s to Mid-1970s 17
  • 2: The Second Phase – Mid-1970s to Mid-1980s 63
  • 3: The Third Phase – Mid-1980s to 2000 91
  • 4: Ideas That Keep Knocking on the Door 125
  • 5: Systemic Formulation 151
  • 6: Current Practice Development 2000–2005 - Conversations Across the Boundaries of Models 172
  • 7: Research and Evaluation 198
  • 8: Reflections and Critique 2005 231
  • Postscripts 240
  • Topic Reading Lists 256
  • Formats for Exploration 290
  • Glossary of Terms 305
  • British Texts 310
  • References 315
  • Index 327
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 335

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.