A History of Our Time: Readings on Postwar America

By William H. Chafe; Harvard Sitkoff et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

More than two decades ago, when we first contemplated putting together a collection of documents and essays on U.S. history since 1945, we agreed that our overriding aim was a book that addressed the real concerns and needs of the students we knew and taught, one lively and challenging enough to provoke discussions in the dorm room as well as the classroom. That is still our aim. Of course, much has changed in the intervening years, and this sixth edition addresses new matters of interest and new viewpoints on continuing issues of relevance. Beginning with this edition, we are joined by a new editor, Beth Bailey. As always, we have incorporated the suggestions of students and instructors who used earlier editions of A History of Our Time. We are grateful for such advice and hope to continue to receive recommendations for future editions.

As in the earlier editions, this book is structured to give students the opportunity to hear different voices of and about the past, to enable them to compare and contrast, and thus to provide a basis for asking critical questions and arriving at independent judgments on major issues. Consequently, each section of the book contains an introduction and headnotes that place the readings in historical perspective and highlight their relevance, documents that provide firsthand, and personal, analyses of postwar issues, and well-written essays that both convey the drama and “humanness” of history and reveal the diversity of themes and interpretations of the recent past. Much, of necessity, has been left out of this brief collection, and we urge those interested to consult the updated Suggestions for Further Reading.

The recent past is not dead; indeed, much of it is not even past. We firmly believe that the history of the last half-century still strongly in-

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Our Time: Readings on Postwar America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 482

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.