A History of Our Time: Readings on Postwar America

By William H. Chafe; Harvard Sitkoff et al. | Go to book overview

HUAC Investigates
Hollywood (1947)

In the fall of 1947 the House Un-American Activities Committee garnered national attention by investigating the Communist Party’s influence within the motion picture industry. Most of the witnesses, like actors Gary Cooper and Ronald Reagan, cooperated with the committee, testifying about communist involvement in the film business and/or assuring HUAC that the movie colony was overwhelmingly anticommunist. A group of screenwriters and directors known as the “Hollywood Ten,” however, refused to answer the committee’s questions about their political beliefs and activities. Led by John Howard Lawson of the Screen Writers Guild, who had on other occasions openly urged fellow-leftists to present the communist position in their films, the ten current or past Communist Party members sought to turn the table and put HUAC on trial for violating their rights of freedom of speech and association. For not divulging their political affiliations, the Hollywood Ten were found guilty of contempt of Congress and served prison terms. Consequently, the entertainment industry adopted blacklists barring the employment of suspected communists or anyone who failed to cooperate with congressional investigators, and HUAC, looking for bigger game, began investigating espionage by public officials and atomic scientists.


RONALD REAGAN, TESTIMONY BEFORE THE HOUSE
UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE (1947)

Staff members present: Mr. Robert E. Stripling, Chief Investigator; Messrs. Louis Russell, H. A. Smith, and Robert B. Gatson, Investigators; and Mr. Benjamin Mand, Director of Research.

MR. STRIPLING: When and where were you born, Mr. Reagan?

MR. REAGAN: Tampico, Illinois, February 6, 1911.

-28-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Our Time: Readings on Postwar America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 482

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.