A History of Our Time: Readings on Postwar America

By William H. Chafe; Harvard Sitkoff et al. | Go to book overview

Declaration of Constitutional
Principles: The Southern
Manifesto (1956)
Signed by 101 members of the U.S. Congress

Even though the experience of World War II had done much to draw the distinct regions of the United States into a more powerful national culture, most white southerners still saw the South as a distinct region, with habits and customs that “outsiders” could not understand. Chief among these “customs” was racial segregation. For white southerners, steeped in a culture of racism and still suspicious of “Yankees” almost one hundred years after the end of the “War between the States,” it was relatively easy to see the Brown decision and all subsequent federal actions related to it as illegitimate interference in problems that northern judges and politicians could not possibly understand. White supremacy was couched in constitutional arguments about States’ Rights and the limits of federal power, and much of the white South began a campaign of massive resistance to Court-ordered integration.

Communities throughout the South responded differently to the integration order, and much depended upon local leadership, both white and black. In many places nothing changed; in others black schoolchildren faced jeering mobs, racist taunting, and even violence. Polls showed that 80 percent of white southerners opposed school integration. In a vacuum of leadership from President Eisenhower, Congressional Democrats from the eleven southern states mobilized, issuing “The Southern Manifesto,” which was signed by 101 senators and representatives.

While this section focuses on the actions of African Americans in demanding change, it is also important to understand the arena of national politics in which those attempting to change the nation’s laws had to maneuver. How does the existence of the “solid South,” both Democratic and anti-integration, limit political options on the national level?

-126-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Our Time: Readings on Postwar America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 482

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.