A History of Our Time: Readings on Postwar America

By William H. Chafe; Harvard Sitkoff et al. | Go to book overview

Gay Is Good (1970)

Martha Shelley

The Gay Liberation movement had its symbolic beginning on June 27, 1969, when New York police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in Greenwich Village. The New York State Liquor Authority regulation that no bar could have more than three homosexual patrons at a given time gave police the authority to raid bars frequented by homosexuals, and patrons of these bars risked arrest. This time, however, the police met unexpected resistance. As the Village Voice described the scene in language that suggests the prejudices of the time, “Limp wrists were forgotten. Beer cans and bottles were heaved at the windows and a rain of coins descended on the cops….” The next day, the slogan “Gay Power” appeared on walls throughout the neighborhood, and that night gay men and women filled the streets, chanting “Gay Power.”

Well before Stonewall, gay men and lesbians had created vibrant, if often secret, communities. “Homophile” organizations worked to end discrimination against homosexuals—but kept membership lists confidential. Though the Kinsey Report had suggested that approximately 10 percent of American men were homosexual, there were very few openly gay men and women in the United States. Even the suspicion of homosexuality carried the risk of expulsion from university, loss of job, and social ostracism. While gay men and lesbians arguably had much to gain by “coming out of the closet,” they also had much to lose. Building a social movement in this situation was a challenge: unlike Black Americans or women, who were (usually) easily identified as such whether or not they wished to be, gay men and lesbians had to choose to be so identified.

The Gay Liberation movement that emerged in the summer of 1969, though not the first movement for the rights of homosexuals, was fundamentally a creation of the 1960s. It grew in part from the social changes that contemporaries called “the sexual revolution,” and was shaped by struggles and victories of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements and by the tactics of protest developed in the latter half of the 1960s. Unlike the homophile movement, which sought assimilation and “tolerance,” the Gay Liberation movement proclaimed “Gay

-222-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Our Time: Readings on Postwar America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 482

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.