A History of Our Time: Readings on Postwar America

By William H. Chafe; Harvard Sitkoff et al. | Go to book overview

March on Washington: The War
Must Be Stopped (1965)
Students for a Democratic Society

On April 17, 1965, thousands of people came together in Washington, D.C., for the first national protest against the war in Vietnam. Few Americans questioned their government’s actions in Vietnam at this point; for most, the war was a peripheral issue. There were very few American military personnel in Vietnam before 1965. But questions about the war had begun to surface, especially on the nation’s college and university campuses. This first national protest was organized by Students for a Democratic Society, still a small and virtually unknown group. SDS members had come to believe that the war was immoral, a threat to the cause of democracy both at home and abroad, and they meant to shake the nation from what they saw as a dangerous complacency. In a stirring speech, Paul Potter, president of SDS, linked the war in Vietnam to failures of democracy within American society. American intervention in Vietnam, he argued that day, did not represent the will of the American people but instead the interests of an interlocking set of elites—military, financial, technocratic. “We must name the system,” he declared.

The following document is an SDS leaflet from November 1965, calling for a second protest, a March on Washington. Some historians have argued that the sort of logic set forth in this leaflet represents a critical flaw in this strand of the American antiwar movement: some leaders drew a false equivalency— largely based on ignorance of Vietnam and its history—between social problems in the United States and the civil war in Vietnam, between civil rights protesters in America and the Vietnamese National Liberation Front. How might such an understanding of America’s involvement in Vietnam shape the course of antiwar protest? Why might the authors of this leaflet have seen the relationship between domestic social problems and foreign policy this way?

-260-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Our Time: Readings on Postwar America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 482

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.