No Small Courage: A History of Women in the United States

By Nancy F. Cott | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1
The Tried and the True
Native American Women
Confronting Colonization

John Demos

The first of the women we now call Native American were actually natives of Asia who lived and died some twenty thousand years ago. They belonged to small bands of prehistoric people who roamed the rugged wilderness of eastern Siberia and survived chiefly by hunting. Some twenty thousand years ago (and in still earlier eras as well) ocean levels were lower, and a land bridge linked Asia and North America where the forty-mile-wide Bering Strait flows today. Across the bridge, from time to time, moved animals of various ancient types—followed by the humans who hunted them.

From this remote beginning flowed the peopling of the Americas. The earth was locked in a bitter Ice Age, but between huge glaciers lay corridors of open land. The hunters and their descendants could walk these corridors from what is now Alaska to milder climes in the south. The process was long and difficult, but by about the year 7000 B.C. people were scattered throughout the Americas. Archaeologists have found their traces—their tools, their graves, the bones of the animals they killed—in campsites as far south as the Strait of Magellan at South America’s lowest tip.

Like other prehistoric groups around the world, these people lived in the manner of the Stone Age. They were nomads who wandered from place to place, in continuous pursuit of their game, which included mastodons, woolly mammoths, antelopes, wild horses, tapirs, and pigs. Eventually, with the passage of many centuries, some of these species became extinct, and the hunters shifted their sights toward smaller game, such as deer and fox and other fur-bearers. They began also to develop new ways of sustaining themselves. Wild roots, berries, nuts, seeds, and fruit became a major part of their diet. This change brought changes in their social patterns. The human bands became somewhat larger and less nomadic. And the balance of duties between men and women gradually shifted. In the first period, men were the hunters and women their helpers. In the second, men still hunted

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
No Small Courage: A History of Women in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 646

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.