No Small Courage: A History of Women in the United States

By Nancy F. Cott | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
New Paths to Power
1890–1920

Karen Manners Smith

In the summer of 1893, more than 27 million women, men, and children from all over the world visited the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, the United States’s unabashed proclamation to the rest of humanity that the young democracy had arrived and was ready to join England and France and Spain as a great world power. President Grover Cleveland laid claim to the nation’s new status when he opened the Chicago fair on May 1, 1893: “Surrounded by the stupendous results of American enterprise and activity … [we] stand today in the presence of the oldest nations of the world and point to the great achievement we here exhibit, asking no allowance on the score of youth…. We have built these splendid edifices, but we have also built the magnificent fabric of a popular government, whose grand proportions are seen throughout the world.…”

Smallest among the “splendid edifices” was the Woman’s Building. The lengthy struggle to build it—and, indeed, the whole battle to include women in the planning and administration of the fair—were proof that there were persistent inequalities under President Cleveland’s “magnificent popular government.” In fact, the women seeking space at the Exposition fared better than 9 million African Americans, virtually excluded from the fair except for displays of handcrafted items in two small exhibits. Few African Americans could be seen attending the fair, though it was open to all who could pay admission, and even black porters and janitors were in short supply.

Women had begun lobbying for a role in the world’s fair in 1889, when Congress started to plan the four hundredth anniversary celebration of Columbus’s arrival in the Americas. A coalition of woman’s rights activists and working women demanded exhibit space for women equal to that being given to men, as well as assignments for women on all the governing boards of the fair. An equally determined group of public-spirited socialites and clubwomen, mostly Chicagoans, pressured Congress for a place at the fair that would include a separate women’s building. An act of Congress created the World’s Columbian Exposition and awarded the fair site to Chicago. A small amendment inserted at the last

-353-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
No Small Courage: A History of Women in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 646

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.